How do I Install an Electric Fence?

Electric fencing can save 30-40% off costs compared with traditional fence, due to using fewer materials and less labor. So, when installing an electric fence, you need to first determine if your fence is going to be permanent or temporary -because the tools, the infrastructure, and the products are all going to be different.

Whether your project is permanent or temporary, whether your fencing in livestock or heading into the backcountry; in our How to Install Electric Fence Guide, we’ll answer questions to help you get started in your electric fencing project. It’s all doable, let’s get to work!

When installing an electric fence, you need to first determine if your fence is going to be permanent or temporary. The tools, the infrastructure, and the products are all going to be different.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WnTbd2C-DCQ&t=12s

Video Transcription

Hi, my name is Liam Shaw with Gallagher. Today we're going to talk about how to install an electric fence. The first thing you have to determine is are you building a permanent fence or are you building a temporary fence, because the infrastructure and the tools and the products are all going to be different.

What materials do you need for a permanent electric fence?

For a permanent electric fence, the main structure is a brace. You've got to build a good solid brace for any type of fence and especially a high-tensile wire fence. High-tensile wire is probably your biggest bang for your buck price per foot and it is also the most conductive that you can buy. It doesn't always apply in all situations, so there's other products for horses or smaller animals. You can use our braided products or we have a coated high-tensile wire as well that's a little more safe for horses. You need to make sure your brace is installed. With New Zealand style or high-tensile wire fence, you can put your posts a lot further apart, saving you time and money.

What materials do you need for a temporary electric fence?

For temporary electric fence, there's many tools that you can use. Installing these, you have to pay attention to how often you're going to be moving it, or if you want to move it at all. When we are putting in temporary fence, you've got to pay attention to the wire type and the distance that you're going to run that wire. You don't want to run a poly wire over a quarter mile. If you have fences that are longer than that, you'd want to step up to a turbo product, which has higher conductivity for longer range fences, for both predator control and to keep the animals in. For bigger livestock, like cows, you can get away with a single strand in some situations, or a three or four-strand perimeter fence. You just got to make sure your wire spacings are adequate so that if the animal does try to touch the fence, they do get shocked.